Influence of Exogenous Hormones and Buck Effect on Galla Goat Productivity in Kenyan Rangelands

  • L. M. Wambulwa Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization
  • J.O. Jung’a University of Nairobi
  • C. B. Rawlynce University of Nairobi
  • S. M. Mbuku Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization

Abstract

Injected estrus hormones are essential in synchronising mating in goats (Capra hircus). This study aimed to determine the response of does injected with hormone and the presence of the buck to stimulate estrus in goats. The does in this study were between first and fourth parity, with a mean age of 4.61 ± 2.02 years and mean body condition score (BCS) of 3.00. The six intact bucks aged 5.2 ± 1.25 years had and a mean BCS of 4.667 ± 0.25. There were two treatments; The Buck effect group (BEG) and the Hormone effect group (HEG). In each treatment there were three replications of n = 10 does. For BEG, males joined does for 21 days. For HEG, estrus was synchronised by injecting 1ml (50 mcg Gonadotropin-releasing hormone GnRH (Cystorelin®) on day zero and day 9 and by injecting 2 ml (100 mcg) of Prostaglandin PGF2α (Enzaprost®) on day 7 and after that bucks introduced for natural mating after 8 hours. After 45 days, a pregnancy test was done using a B-mode ultrasound scanner transducer of 5 MHz. Estrus response and the conception data analysed using SPSS version 22 software of 2013 showed a significant difference (p˂ 0.05) between the does treated with hormone and those responding to the presence of the buck. The buck effect group had a higher estrus response of 90% than those administered with exogenous hormones 66.7%. Therefore, adopting assisted reproductive techniques using “male effect” may improve reproduction in local hardy Galla goat and enhance their resilience in an ever-changing environment.

Published
2023-11-30
How to Cite
Wambulwa, L. M., Jung’a, J., Rawlynce, C. B., & Mbuku, S. M. (2023). Influence of Exogenous Hormones and Buck Effect on Galla Goat Productivity in Kenyan Rangelands. East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal, 87(3&4), 9. Retrieved from https://www.kalro.org/www.eaafj.or.ke/index.php/path/article/view/659