Efficacy of commonly used on-farm ant-helmintics among dorper sheep farms in Kajiado County, Kenya

  • K.R Morinket Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization, Veterinary Science Research Institute
  • J. Mutiso Department of Zoological Sciences, Kenyatta University
  • J. Nginyi Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization, Veterinary Science Research Institute,
  • S. Mbuku Department of Zoological Sciences, Kenyatta University

Abstract

Ineffective anthelmintics continues to reduce productivity in livestock due to increased worm burdens in dewormed animals. This in-effectiveness has been majorly noted in small ruminants causing serious health and productivity constraints. Widespread resistance towards available anthelmintics is the main cause of in-effectiveness. This study sought to determine the efficacy of the most commonly used on-farm anthelmintic for Dorper sheep in Kajiado and also identify factors associated with the rising cases of their resistance. Questionnaire surveys targeting different farms were used to assess the community’s knowledge and attitudes on these infections. Animals not treated within the last three months and with faecal egg counts of ≥ 150 egg per gram were selected for the study. They were divided into 4 groups of 18 animals each. Group A was treated with Albendazole orally, Group B with Oxyclozanide/levamisole orally, Group C with Ivermectin injection subcutaneously while Group D served as the untreated control group. Faecal egg counts and cultures were done on day 0 (pre-treatment) and on day 14 (post-treatment). Faecal cultures were used to identify the principal nematode genera present in the pre- and post-treatment phases. Anthelmintic efficacy was established using the faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT). The mean faecal egg counts (FECs) between groups (treated and control) was not significantly different (P > 0.05) before treatment. However, on D14. FECs of Group C were significantly different (P < 0.05) from the rest of the treated groups. All anthelmintics exerted a reduction (P <0.05) on nematode egg counts post-treatment. Faecal egg count egg reduction results revealed 86%, 76% and 17% for levamisole, albendazole and ivermectin respectively. In the case of pre-treatment cultures, Haemonchus, Oesophagostomum, Cooperia, Trichostrongilus and
Strongiloides were present indicating multiple parasitic infections. Post-treatment faecal cultures showed that Haemonchus, Oesophagostomum and Trichostrongilus had escaped the treatments. However, Haemonchus were the predominant genera present. Based on these findings, it can be concluded that multiple drug resistance has been confirmed in Kajiado County and this has negative effects on the productivity of these animals. However, the level of resistance observed was apparently very high in ivermectin. It is therefore, recommended that animal health extension services in the County should be deployed to create awareness on the emerging threat of anthelmintic resistance and how to manage it

Published
2022-06-03
How to Cite
Morinket, K., Mutiso, J., Nginyi, J., & Mbuku, S. (2022). Efficacy of commonly used on-farm ant-helmintics among dorper sheep farms in Kajiado County, Kenya. East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal, 85(1-4), 11. Retrieved from https://www.kalro.org/www.eaafj.or.ke/index.php/path/article/view/530