Drivers of perceived sustainability of climate smart Agricultural projects in Kakamega County, Kenya

  • J. J. Okumu Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development, School of Agriculture, Food Security and Environmental Sciences, Maseno University
  • K.W. Sibiko Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development, School of Agriculture, Food Security and Environmental Sciences, Maseno University
  • P. B. Mose Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development, School of Agriculture, Food Security and Environmental Sciences, Maseno University

Abstract

Climate uncertainty challenges the livelihoods of smallholder farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa. The sustainability of climate-smart agriculture projects is considered essential for the continued delivery of services to  the  beneficiary  farmers  beyond  external  financing. However, various factors cause climate-smart agriculture projects to fail the sustainability test. This study evaluated the perceived sustainability of climate-smart agriculture projects and the socio-economic and institutional determinants  of  sustainability.  Stratified  sampling  was used to select 240 climate-smart project participants from the 12 sub-counties in Kakamega County. The study collected primary data using questionnaires and interview schedules from the sample project participants. Most farmers (94%) perceived climate-smart agriculture projects as sustainable. The Ordered Probit results demonstrated that the perceived sustainability of the projects  was  positively  influenced  by  the  number  of practices adopted from the project (at P> 0.00 level), the longevity of farmer participation (at P> 0.09 level) and training (at P> 0.06 level); and negatively influenced by legal land ownership status (at P> 0.02 level), farming experience (at P> 0.08 level) and adoption cost (at P> 0.03 level). The study recommends that projects and practices should be designed and developed under a bottom-up approach that allows the initial assessment of local needs. Farmers should be involved right from the onset to reduce unnecessary expenses. Training on innovative agriculture practices should also be tailored to suit farmers’ different needs and capabilities so that farmers become capable and skilled to increase their farm productivity.

Published
2022-05-26
How to Cite
Okumu, J. J., Sibiko, K., & Mose, P. B. (2022). Drivers of perceived sustainability of climate smart Agricultural projects in Kakamega County, Kenya. East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal, 85(1-4), 12. Retrieved from https://www.kalro.org/www.eaafj.or.ke/index.php/path/article/view/507